TRC Blog

Traveling North to South

Posted May 20, 2015

If someone asked me what my life was like before college, I could sum it up in one word: sports. My father taught me to alpine ski at age two, I was riding a bike and playing soccer by five, and my parents took us kids all over the world to hike and horseback ride for as long as I can remember. All of these activities combined with my upbringing in the remote Upper Peninsula of Michigan resulted in a lot of outdoor time. Even now, that’s where I’m happiest – outdoors.

Unfortunately, it’s hard to continue playing sports when you blow out a knee. And I blew mine out not once, but twice. I achieved a lot of cool things while I was in the world of young competitive athletics, including a state championship while ski racing in high school and a fun run with Michigan State University’s club soccer team, but then my ACL tore for a second time. I was mentally and physically done with competitive sports for good after that. However, I like to think life was just guiding me toward my next adventure – the world of environmental policy. This is what I chose to study in order to continue incorporating my love of the outdoors into everyday life. Classes were great. Writing, arguing, and presenting things about the natural world… I was hooked. Of course, policy and Washington D.C. go hand in hand.

I spent a summer in D.C. with the Demmer Scholars program (a natural resources advocacy program) after sophomore year of college. It was wondrous by any definition of the word, meeting and seeing people I had only ever read about or heard on the news. I was interning for a forestry association, which was right up my alley. When it was time to go home to Michigan I realized that I had caught Potomac fever. Potomac fever isn’t a real disease, but a psychological phenomenon wherein one comes to DC, leaves, and can’t stop thinking about returning one day. So here I am two years later. I finished up my degree in environmental policy this December and now have the opportunity to work for the Thermostat Recycling Corporation. Here’s to my new adventures living the city life, a different kind of wild. Cheers!